6 foot Picnic Table Plans

Ovidiu 30 GapDice RANDOM PLAN

This step by step diy project is about 6 foot picnic picnic table plans plans. I have designed this outdoor picnic table with a traditional look, so you can save money, have fun and add value to your home. If you have a recreation area or a bbq in your backyard, this project is a must have addition. Take a look over the rest of my woodworking plans, if you want to get more building inspiration. Premium Plans available for this project in the Shop (not identical, improved version).

You should remember that all my woodworking plans come with 3D diagrams, step by step instructions and complete Cut and Shopping lists. Inn addition, you can Print or PDF download the plans for free, so you can take the plans with you in the shop. I did my job, now it is your turn to build amazing pieces of furniture!

When buying the lumber, you should select the planks with great care, making sure they are straight and without any visible flaws (cracks, knots, twists, decay). Investing in cedar or other weather resistant lumber is a good idea, as it will pay off on the long run. Use a spirit level to plumb and align the components, before inserting the galvanized screws, otherwise the project won’t have a symmetrical look. If you have all the materials and tools required for the project, you could get the job done in about a day.

 

 

Projects made from these plans

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It’s that simple to build a 6 ft picnic table!

 

 

6 foot Picnic Table Plans

Building-a-6-ft-picnic-table

Building-a-6-ft-picnic-table

 

Cut + Shopping Lists

  • A – 4 pieces of 2×6 lumber – 36″ long LEGS
  • B – 3 piece of 2×4 lumber – 28 1/2″ long SUPPORTS
  • C – 2 pieces of 2×6 lumber – 60″ long SUPPORTS
  • D – 5 pieces of 2×6 lumber – 72″ long TABLETOP
  • E – 4 pieces of 2×6 lumber – 72″ long SEAT
  • F – 2 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 34 1/2″ long BRACES

Tools

 Hammer, Tape measure, Framing square, Level

 Miter saw, Drill machinery, Screwdriver, Sander

 Safety Gloves, Safety Glasses

Time

 One day

Related

 

 

 

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Step 1: How to build the frames for the 6 foot picnic table

Building-the-legs

Building-the-legs

The first step of the outdoor project is to build the legs for the 6′ picnic table. As you can easily see in the diagram, you need to make 30 degree cuts to both ends of the 2×6 legs. Smooth the edges with sandpaper.

Tabletop-supports

Tabletop-supports

Next, you need to build the tabletop supports from 2×4 lumber. Make 45 degree cuts to both ends of the supports, following the diagram. Moreover, drill pocket holes into the 2×4 supports, so you can lock it to the tabletop slats.

 

Step 2: Assembling the tabletop

Assembling the tabletop

Assembling the tabletop

Lay the 2×6 tabletop slats on a level surface. Place 1/4″ plywood pieces between the slats so you can create even gaps. Fit the supports to the slats and then place them equally spaced. Insert 2 1/2″ screws to secure the supports into place tightly.

Decorative cuts

Decorative cuts

Use a jigsaw to make round decorative cuts to the corners of the tabletop.

 

Step 3: Assembling the frame of the picnic table

Fitting the supports

Fitting the supports

Fit the 2×6 legs to the picnic table, as shown in the diagram. Clamp the legs to the supports and then drill pilot holes through both components. Insert 3 1/2″ carriage bolts and tighten the components into place. Use two bolts for each joint for a professional result. Using the carriage bolts will also make disassembling the picnic table easy, if you want to move it to another location.

 

Step 4: Fitting the seat supports

Seat-supports

Seat-supports

Build the seat supports from 2×6 lumber. Make 45 degree cuts to both ends of the supports, as shown in the plans.

Fitting the seat supports

Fitting the seat supports

Align the seat supports to the legs and then clamp them into place tightly. Drill two pilot holes through the braces and through the legs, for each joint. Insert 3 1/2″ carriage bolts to lock the components together tightly. Use a spirit level to plumb the seat supports horizontally.

 

Step 5: Fitting the diagonal braces

Building the diagonal braces

Building the diagonal braces

Build the braces for the table from 2×4 lumber. Make 25 degree cuts to both ends of the diagonal braces and then get the job done with another small cut to the top end.

Fitting the braces

Fitting the braces

Fit the diagonal braces to the picnic table, making sure the corners are square. Use a spirit level to plumb the legs and to check if the top is horizontal. Drill pilot holes and insert 2 1/2″ screws to lock the braces to the frame of the picnic table.

 

Step 6: Fitting the seats

Fitting the seat slats

Fitting the seat slats

Last but not least, you need fit the 2×6 seat slats. Center the slats to the frame of the picnic table, drill pilot holes and insert 2 1/2″ screws. Countersink the head of the screws for a neat result.

 

Step 7: Finishing touches

6 Picnic Table

6 Picnic Table

Last but not least, you need to take care of the finishing touches. Fill the holes with wood putty and let them harden for a few hours. Smooth the surface with 120-220 grit sandpaper and round the exposed edges with a router. Apply a few coats of paint or stain to protect the lumber from the elements and to enhance the look of the 6 foot picnic table.

How to build a 6 foot picnic table

How to build a 6 foot picnic table

This picnic table is the ideal project for any garden, as it is easy to build and it the materials don’t cost a fortune. Moreover, if you have a drill, a saw and a sander, you will get the job done in one weekend.

6 foot Picnic Table

6 foot Picnic Table

Don’t forget to take a look over the rest of my picnic table plans HERE. I have designed lots of woodworking plans so you can add value to your home, save money and have FUN.

 

 

This woodworking project was about 6 foot picnic table plans free. If you want to see more outdoor plans, check out the rest of our step by step projects and follow the instructions to obtain a professional result.












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30 Comments »

  1. Rob at - Reply

    Hey Julian,

    Nice table. How did you go about determining the length and angle of the legs?

    Rob

    • Julian at - Reply

      It is the standard size and angle.

  2. Luke at - Reply

    I had to use 1 5/8 screws because the 2 1/2 inch screws were too deep for the support beams across the 2 x 6 slats and ended up coming through the 2 x 6. I used the typical Craig jig.

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      Thanks for the feedback. I would love to see your project. You can send the pics at: http://myoutdoorplans.com/contact/

    • Amanda at - Reply

      Luke,
      We’re using a Craig jig as well, did you replace the screws for the pocket screws or the 2 1/2″ screws?

  3. Kevin Thorpe at - Reply

    I just made this picnic table and I really like it. Please know that the material list is correct but there is an error in the instruction steps regarding the 2 diagonal braces. The steps say to use 2 x 6 lumber but it should say 2 x 4.

  4. Saunders jadyn at - Reply

    Im a boy scout and ive decided to make one of these for an eagle project but one issue is i dont see the amount of screws.. help?

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      10 pieces of 2 1/2″ pocket screws
      50 pieces of 2 1/2″ screws
      16 pieces of 3 12″ carriage bolts

  5. Ethan Wehrman at - Reply

    What is the cost estimate on this?

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      There is a materials list on the plan. You can easily add up you local costs for an estimate.

  6. Gemma at - Reply

    I’m very excited to build this. I’d love a hole in the centre for an umbrella. Could you tell me how to go about this please?

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      You should use a hole saw drill bit. Mark the diagonals of the top and then drill the holes.

  7. Matthew vella at - Reply

    What is the distance between each pocket hole that I make into the tabletop “B” supports?

    Thanks,

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      It’s 5 1/2″ so that each screws gets in the tabletop boards.

  8. Jarod at - Reply

    I think the diagnal brace step had an measuring error. It calls for a 25 degree cut, but shows only 1 5/8″ cut up the board. I checked it and saw that it is an actual 2 1/2″ mark for a 25 degree cut.
    Will someone check me on this? Its the first visually questionable thing Ive noticed going through the steps.

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      I have double checked it and the diagram is correct. You need to use 2×4 lumber and not 2×6, as it was written in the instructions (in the cut list it was correctly listed), that’s why you got the difference.

  9. David Grant at - Reply

    What are the spacing of the pocket holes on the 2×4 tabletop supports? Thanks great plans!

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      That doesn’t matter that much. Just try to make them equally spaced. Doesn’t have to be perfect.

  10. Braiden Eccleston at - Reply

    do these need to be true 2×4 and 2×6’s

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      No, all my designs use actual size of lumber, not nominal.

  11. Zuleyka at - Reply

    Could you provide the total amount of each hardware size needed? Thank you.

  12. Peter at - Reply

    I purchased your 6 foot table plans and I can access the designs anymore. It’s saying that I viewed the document too many times and won’t accept my email address to l we t me view them again.

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      So you can give me a 1 star review, but you cannot download the plans that come directly to your email. Very smart of you.

  13. Monica Limberti at - Reply

    Just want to Thank you for posting in your website the instructions who to build a pícnic table . My husband. And my Daughter just followed every step , they finished within 2 Days Thank you very much

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      You’re welcome. Put it to good use. Cheers!

  14. Carrie Taylor at - Reply

    I just wanted to say thank you for providing such thorough, complete plans. My son used these and the plans for the 8 foot table for his Eagle Scout project and it went beautifully. I would be happy to send you pictures if you like? We also used the 8 foot plans and added an additional 2 feet on one end for wheelchair access. Thanks again! 🙂

  15. Silas Donham at - Reply

    These are great plans, thanks so much for all the detail. I’m adapting this plan to make an accessible picnic table for wheelchair users and I wonder if you or anyone who’s made it can tell me how high the table top is?










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