12×12 Shed Roof Plans

Ovidiu 28 GapDice RANDOM PLAN

This step by step diy woodworking project is about 12×12 shed roof plans. This article features detailed instructions for building a gable roof for a 12×12 gable roof. Take a look over PART 1 of the project to learn how to build the frame for the shed. This roof is designed to keep the costs under control and to save materials as much as possible.

When buying the lumber, you should select the planks with great care, making sure they are straight and without any visible flaws (cracks, knots, twists, decay). Investing in cedar or other weather resistant lumber is a good idea, as it will pay off on the long run. Use a spirit level to plumb and align the components, before inserting the galvanized screws, otherwise the project won’t have a symmetrical look. If you have all the materials and tools required for the project, you could get the job done in about a day.

 

 

Projects made from these plans

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12×12 Shed Roof Plans

Building a 12x12 shed

Building a 12×12 shed

 

  • F – 7 pieces of 2×6 lumber – 144″ long, 14 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 96″ long, 14 pieces – 23 1/2″ long, 7 pieces – 35 1/2″ long TRUSSES
  • F – 4 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 21 3/4″ long, 8 pieces – 22 1/2″ long BLOCKINGS
  • G – 8 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 96″ long, 36 pieces – 7″ long,  OVERHANGS
  • H – 4 pieces of 3/4″ plywood – 10 3/4″x93 3/4″ long, 2 pieces – 48″x96″ long, 2 pieces – 48″x48″ long, 2 pieces – 45 3/4″x96″ long, 2 pieces – 45 3/4″x96″ long ROOF
  • I – 270 sq ft of tar paper, 270 sq ft of asphalt shingles ROOFING

 One day

 

 

Building a 12×12 shed roof

Building the bottom rafters

Building the bottom rafters

Build the bottom rafters from 2×6 lumber.

Building the trusses

Building the trusses

The first step of the project is to build the rafters for the shed. Use 2×4 lumber for the regular rafters and 2×6 lumber for the bottom rafters. Cut both ends of the rafters at 60 degrees (set the miter saw at 30 degrees) and both ends of the bottom rafters at 30 degrees (set miter saw at 60 degrees).

Fitting the vertical supports

Fitting the vertical supports

In addition, you have to add vertical supports to the trusses. Cut the top of the vertical supports at 30 degrees (set miter saw at 60 degrees). Smooth the edges with sandpaper.

Building the gussets

Building the gussets

Use 1/2″ plywood for the gussets. Mark the cut lines on the plywood sheet and get the job done with a saw. Smooth the edges with sandpaper.

Fitting the gussets

Fitting the gussets

Fit the gussets to the joints, as shown in the diagram. Drill pilot holes and insert 1 5/8″ screws to lock the components together tightly. Add glue to the joints.

Fitting the trusses

Fitting the trusses

Fit the trusses to the top of the shed. Make sure you place the trusses 24″ on center. Use hardware to lock the bottom rafters to the top plates. Use a spirit level to plumb the trusses.

Fitting the blockings

Fitting the blockings

Fit 2×4 blockings to the top rails, between the rafters, if you want to make sure the shed is properly insulated.

Fitting the gable ends

Fitting the gable ends

Cut the panels for the gable ends from 5/8″ T1-11 siding. Fit the panels to the structure of the shed and lock them into place with 1 5/8″ screws/nails.

Building the overhang

Building the overhang

Build the overhangs from 2×4 lumber. You can adjust the size of the overhangs to suit your needs. Drill pilot holes through the rafters and insert 2 1/2″ screws into the blockings.

Fitting the overhangs

Fitting the overhangs

Fit the overhangs to the 12×12 shed. Drill pilot holes and insert 3 1/2″ screws into the frame.

Fitting the roofing sheets

Fitting the roofing sheets

Attach 3/4″ plywood sheets to the rafters, using the pattern shown in the diagram. Drill pilot holes and insert 1 5/8″ screws, every 8″ along the rafters. Leave no gaps between the tongue and groove sheets.

Fitting the roofing

Fitting the roofing

Cover the roof of the shed with roofing felt, making sure the strips overlap at least 2″. Secure the tar paper to the plywood sheets with roofing staples. In addition, cut a 12″ piece for the top ridge. Fit the side drip edges over the roofing felt, while the bottom drip edges should be fit under.

12x12 shed plans

12×12 shed plans

Fill the holes with wood putty and let them dry out for a few hours. Smooth the surface with 100-220 grit sandpaper and remove the residues with a damp cloth.

Top Tip: Apply a few coats of paint or stain to the components, to enhance the look of the project. Check PART 1 of the project to learn how to build the frame of the shed and PART 3 to learn how to build the door for the shed.

 

 

This woodworking project was about 12×12 shed roof plans free. If you want to see more outdoor plans, check out the rest of our step by step projects and follow the instructions to obtain a professional result.

 

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28 Comments »

  1. Edgar B at - Reply

    Do the gamble ends go over the siding or do i have to account for the gambles ends thickness before i slap the sid9ling on? in other words is the siding sandwiched between the truss and the gamble end?

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      Gable ends? Do you mean the overhangs? Yes, I have considered the thickness of the siding. The overhangs go over the siding sheets.

  2. Tracy at - Reply

    On the list for the siding you only call for 12 sheets, if my calculations are correct this wont be enough for the gable ends, can you clarify? thanks

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      That’s true. I have added the 3 sheets needed for the gable ends, on this list.

  3. ray fishet at - Reply

    The 2 x 6 must be cut at 60 degrees and the 2 x 4 at 30. Otherwise they won line uo. Hopefully the corrections will be made so no one else waste a 2 x 6 x 12 like I did today. I was able to reuse the 2 x 4 on the center braces

    • Ovidiu at - Reply

      Sorry for that Ray, but the diagrams say cut AT 30 degrees. That means the ends need to have 30 degrees AFTER you make the cut. The diagrams doesn’t say to make a 30 degree cut. Sorry for the confusion again.

  4. Raymond Rogers at - Reply

    Send blueprints to my email

  5. Trevor at - Reply

    Confused about the blockings and what they are and how and where exactly they go? Any pictures from anyone? Are the rafters sturdy enough by using the rafter ties?

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