Vegetable Trug Planter Plans

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This step by step diy woodworking project is about vegetable trug planter plans. I have designed this 6 ft long raised planter so you can grow vegetables in your own backyard. Make sure you invest in cedar or redwood, as the components will be exposed to the weather elements. Check out all my raised garden bed HERE. If you enjoy my design, don’t forget to take a look over the rest of my free plans HERE.

There are so many designs and materials to choose from, that we really recommend you to spend some time researching the most suitable plans for your needs. If you still haven’t found what you are looking for, we strongly recommend you to pay attention to these instructions and to check out the related projects, if you want to get more ideas and potential projects for your home and garden.

 

 

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Vegetable Trug Planter Plans Plans

Building a vegetable trug

Building a vegetable trug

 

  • A – 6 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 20 1/4″ long, 4 pieces – 22 3/4″ long LEGS
  • B – 2 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 30 3/4″ long STRETCHER
  • C – 3 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 72″ long BOTTOM
  • D – 6 pieces of 2×2 lumber – 12 3/4″ long SUPPORTS
  • E – 6 pieces of 1×6 lumber – 72″ long SIDES
  • F – 4 pieces of 1×6 lumber – 23″ long, 2 pieces – 16 3/4″ long ENDS

 One day

 

 

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How to build a vegetable planter

Building the legs

Building the legs

The first step of the project is to build the legs for the vegetable trug. As you can easily see in the diagram, you need to use a miter saw to make the angle cuts at both ends of the pieces.

Assembling the a frame legs

Assembling the a frame legs

The next step of the project is to assemble the A-frame supports, by fitting the horizontal support. Align the edges with attention, drill pilot holes and

Attaching the botton slats

Attaching the bottom slats

Fit the 2×4 slats to the frames to form the bottom of the garden bed. Leave no gaps between the slats and align them at both ends, for a professional result. Drill pilot holes and insert 3 1/2″ screws to lock them into place tightly.

Building the side panel supports

Building the side panel supports

Use 2×2 lumber for the raised bed supports. Use a miter saw to make the angle cuts at both ends, as shown in the diagram.

Building the side panels

Building the side panels

Use 1×6 lumber for the side panels. Drill pilot holes through the slats and insert 1 5/8″ screws into supports. Leave no gaps between the slats and align them at both ends.

Fitting the side panels

Fitting the side panels

Fit the side panels to the vegetable trug and align the edges with attention. Use 2 1/2″ screws to lock the side panels to the A-frame legs.

End slats

End slats

Attach the 1×6 slats to the ends of the planter box. Use a saw to make the angle cuts and then align the edges with attention. Drill pilot holes and insert 1 5/8″ screws to lock them into place tightly.

Fitting the top slats

Fitting the top slats

Fill the 1×6 slats to the top of the planter box. Use 1 5/8″ screws to lock the slats into place tightly.

Fitting the stretchers

Fitting the stretchers

Use 2×4 lumber for the stretchers. Drill pocket holes at both ends of the stretchers and then secure them into place with 2 1/2″ screws.

6' Vegetable Trug Plans

6′ Vegetable Trug Plans

After assembling the vegetable trug, you need to take care of the finishing touches. Use sandpaper to smooth the surface and fill the holes with wood putty. Use 80-220 grit sandpaper. Apply a few coats of stain/paint over the A-frame legs.

Vegetable Trug Plans Free

Vegetable Trug Plans Free

This is a simple woodworking project, so any person with basic diy skills can get the job done in one weekend. You can adjust the size of the off the ground planter box to suit your needs. If you like my project, I recommend you to take a look over the rest of my woodworking plans HERE.  Choose from thousands of free designs and fill your life with DIY joy!

 

 

This woodworking project was about vegetable trug planter plans. If you want to see more outdoor plans, we recommend you to check out the rest of my step by step projects. LIKE us on Facebook and Google + to be the first that gets out latest projects.












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One Comment »

  1. William at - Reply

    A few thoughts, about this plan:
    1. why miter cut angles of 50.3 and 69.7 degrees, when you could simply cut that piece at 50 and 70 degrees?
    2. the cross piece, for the A-frame support, shows that it’s 20″ at the top, 22-3/4″ at the bottom, and there’s a 1-1/4″ difference, between the top & bottom, on each end. BAD MATH! That should be 1-3/8″ difference, on each end.
    3. you also left the A-frame assembly instructions incomplete (sentence ends with “drill pilot holes and”…and then, nothing!
    4. You can save a ton of wood scraps from being cut, on the end pieces, by cutting the first piece, flipping the board over, cutting the 2nd piece, flipping the board over, etc. You’re cutting those at a 30 degree angle, so it’s easy to do this.
    5. you’re screwing 1×6 slats to each other, and the cut end of a 2×2, at the top of the box? Not much support, especially putting a screw through the end slat, and into the end of the side slat (remember, they’re only 3/4″ thick). Granted, not much soil pressure, up against those slats….but there will be SOME. That’s a definite point of failure, without something beefier, there.

    Finally, on the bottom, the stretchers are being held, in the center, with pocket screws? I understand the idea is to prevent the planter bottom from sagging, but there’s probably better/easier ways to accomplish this (dowel the inner ends to the center A-frame, perhaps?). You could also add a 72” piece of wood, flat against the A-frame legs and stretchers, and screwed into all of them, that would be MUCH stronger.

    Just my 2 cents. If I try this plan, I’ll come back, and share my findings….and any mistakes that I make!

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